Sustainable Maryland Community Certification Report

Download PDF Version

This is the Sustainable Maryland Certification Report of Frostburg (Allegany), a Sustainable Maryland bronze applicant.

Frostburg (Allegany) was certified on October 10, 2017 with 210 points. Listed below is information regarding Frostburg (Allegany)’s Sustainable Maryland efforts and materials associated with the applicant’s certified actions.

Contact Information

The designated Sustainable Maryland contact for Frostburg (Allegany) is:

Name:L.J. Bennett
Title/Position:Director / Community Development
Address:59 E Main Street
Frostburg, MD 21532
Phone:3016896000

Sustainability Actions Implemented

Each approved action and supporting documentation for which Frostburg (Allegany) was approved for in 2017 appears below. Note: Standards for the actions below may have changed and the documentation listed may no longer satisfy requirements for that action. Additionally, points associated with actions prior to 2013 certifications may not be accurate.

  • Green Team

    Complete a Green Team Action Plan

    10 Points Mandatory

    Program Summary:

    The Green Team developed a Community Survey based off the Sustainable Maryland Certified sample survey. Some questions were added and other removed to answer questions specific to issues facing Frostburg. The survey was an online survey created using Google Forms; it was advertised on Facebook, the City’s website, and in Frostburg City Hall. There were 179 online responses and 4 paper surveys that were completed. Valuable information was received through the survey, including from a free response section. The survey responses were used to prioritize action items for the Green Team over the next three years. The Green Team worked together to determine which actions should be taken in 2017 to 2020 and then developed an outline sheet for each action, which has been included in the Action Plan. Some actions that have been identified and included in the Plan have been recognized by the City and were in varying degrees of planning stages. Other action items are a direct result of feedback received from the survey. A common thread in the survey was that the respondents may not be aware of all the resources, amenities, and services available to them, especially to new residents, and the Pocket Park project concept was developed from discussions reviewing the community survey.

    Create Green Team

    10 Points Mandatory

    Program Summary:

    The City of Frostburg began its pursuit of Sustainable Maryland Certified designation on February of 2016, when the Frostburg Mayor and City Council authorized a resolution supporting participation in the Sustainable Maryland Certified Program. Commissioner Woody Getz, and Elizabeth Stahlman, the Community Development Director, were the initial leads for the certification process. Mr. Getz and Ms. Stahlman developed a press release that was published on the City’s website, the Frostburg Express paper, and the City’s Facebook page, informing the community of the City’s participation in the Sustainable Maryland Certified program and soliciting interested individuals willing to serve on the Green Team. There was some interest garnered from the press release, but additional outreach was done in order to obtain 12 members on the Green Team. The City received letters of interest and resumes from all interested individuals willing to serve on the Green Team. The selected individuals were appointed by the Mayor and City Council by Resolution on August 18, 2016. The first Green Team meeting was held on August 30, 2016. The second Green Team meeting was held on September 20, 2016. During the meetings in the last 9 months, the Green Team has: discussed the goals and purpose of the Sustainable Maryland Certified designation; completed Green Team training; reviewed the action items already completed to date by the City; developed a community survey and reviewed results of the survey; and, developed an Action Plan based on the survey results.

    Participate in SM Green Team Training

    5 Points

    Program Summary:

    On October 26, 2016, Sustainable Maryland’s Mike Hunninghake presented, “Green Team Training: A Greenprint for Communities” to members of the City of Frostburg’s Green Team from 5:000 to 6:30 p.m. at the Frostburg City Hall. Eight Team Members were in attendance. Following a brief history of Sustainable Maryland program, Mr. Hunninghake noted that Oakland was also in the process of applying for certification and that Hagerstown became a Certified Community in 2015. Mr. Hunninghake stated that many of Frostburg’s current actions allowed the City to reach its needed number of points as part of the calculation process. For example, a green team has been established and was in the process of being trained, the City has an established Farmers Market and a Small Business Saturday campaign as well as a Tree City USA certification, a DHCD Sustainable Communities program, and a Backyard Chicken Ordinance. He discussed other possible points to be garnered through an existing Pet Waste Ordinance, LED Streetlights, Solar Co-op, Hydro Project, Buy Local Campaign, and Frostburg Grows activities. Mr. Hunninghake answered questions about the Green Team’s action plan, survey component, and application process. Green Team members sought clarification on the survey process as it relates to Frostburg’s application timeline, i.e.: does the team survey the community first and then create an action plan or reverse the process? Takeaways from the training: 1. Reach out to other Certified Sustainable Maryland Communities, such as Havre de Grace, Mt Airy, Thurmont, and Hagerstown. 2. Use the certification spreadsheet previously provided. 3. Conduct our survey of Frostburg in our first year, using Sustainable Maryland’s template or adapting it to our community. 4. Engage our community by using social media, community bulletin boards, exhibit tables at community events, and free press. 5. Use the survey to inform Frostburg’s Action Plan.

  • Community Based Food System

    Innovative Demonstration Projects - Community Based Food

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Frostburg adopted an Ordinance to change the City Code and the Frostburg Zoning Ordinance to allow for the keeping of chickens within City limits. The Mayor and Council chose to take this action after requests from citizens and conducting a community survey. The regulations were drafted based on public input and other ordinances in place around the state. Depending on lot size, up to 4 or 6 hens can be kept at single and twin-family residential dwellings within City limits. Chickens may be kept at rental properties, with consent of the property owner. The owner of the chickens are to purchase a chicken license from the City once every other year for a fee of $30. The Chicken Ordinance allows residents of the City of Frostburg to keep a practical number of animals for an urban setting, while allowing the owners to enjoy chickens as pets and be able to raise animals to produce eggs for their household. There are safeguards provided in the Ordinance to protect adjacent property owners from excess dirt, noise, and odor that may be caused by the chickens. To date, there have been no complaints regarding chickens in the City since the Ordinance has been in place. There are currently 5 active chicken permits.

  • Local Food Consumption

    Establish Local Farmers Market

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Local farmers have been bringing their produce to the City of Frostburg to sell on a weekly basis from June to September for more than ten years. Three farm families have been the major suppliers for the market, while other vendors have sold plants, flowers, and food related items (baked goods, and preserves). The City’s main role had been to restrict parking in an area along Main Street on marked day so that vendors could park their trucks and make their sales. Three years ago, the City expanded its role by allowing farmers to use City Place (a building which provides protection from the elements), and publicizing market days with street signs, posters, radio advertisement, and local newspaper coverage. The market schedule is posted on the City’s website. The summer market now includes six farmers (two of which are CSAs). Rules for sales had to be established since popular items are often sold out. People come early and stand in line along the sidewalk waiting for the official time for vendors to begin selling their wares. The market has been so popular that some farmers have extended their offerings throughout the winter months selling root crops, apples, cheese, frozen meat, baked goods, and preserves at the Mountain City Traditional Arts Center biweekly. The hours of the summer market are Fridays 9:30 am - 1:00 pm, and the winter market is The 1st and 3rd Saturday. 10:00 am - 1:00 pm. In 2017, the farmers market will have 9 vendors; 4 are family farms, 2 sell live plants, 1 is a craft vendor, 1 sells hot food, 1 sells coffee. We will be losing 2 vendors; 1 organic and 1 certified naturally grown. This will leave the market with one CSA farmer. The Allegany County Farmers Market received a grant from Maryland Agriculture Council. They are working with FSU student Olivia Lewis to develop a map of farms in our region to better connect the farmers to the public. This will be available on our website and brochures. We are working on developing banners, stickers, magnets and canvas tote bags. The market does accept WIC and SNAP. However, this year SNAP benefits will not be doubled, nor does the Farmer's Market participate in the national market voucher program. The SNAP match program was locally funded. People are still encouraged to use SNAP and WIC. The market manager is Jeanette Rinehart and Clare Buckle is the coordinator for the Allegany Mountain Fresh market. http://alleganymountainfresh.weebly.com/ https://www.facebook.com/FrostburgFarmersMarket/ Financial statements are not available specifically for the Frostburg Farmer's market, as Frostburg's market is part of the Allegany Mountain Fresh market which has several venues.

  • Local Food Production

    Community Gardens

    15 Points Priority

    Program Summary:

    In the spring of 2016, the City of Frostburg announced the formation of its first community garden. The result of the diligent labors of many city officials and community volunteers was the formation of the not-for-profit organization known as the Uhl Street Community Garden (USCG). The city purchased a vacant old church lot of approximately 0.1 acres on Uhl St.; the commission of this sale ($750) was donated by Commissioner Donny Carter to cover the purchase and installation of a bulletin board, a frost-free water tap (installed by the City of Frostburg’s Water Department) and locks. The remainder of these monies were deposited into the USCG checking account to be used for future expenses and/or improvements. Also, Western Maryland Health System donated a tool shed and some tools to the garden and a 250-gallon rain cube was donated to the garden by Frostburg Grows. The Frostburg City Council waived the first year’s water bill for the USCG. After a few public meetings were held to gauge and generate interest, a four-person volunteer committee was formed to manage the USCG and act as liaison between the city officials and the garden members. The committee then entered into an operating agreement with the City to establish rules and expectations for the use of the lot as a community garden. The USCG is open to any and all community members on a first-come first-served basis. In its inaugural year, the USCG hosted 17 community members and cultivated 16-4’x8’ garden plots. The USCG will serve as a template to form additional community gardens in the City of Frostburg. Currently, there are 22 plots that are 5x10' in size.

  • Energy

    Innovative Demonstration Projects - Energy

    30 Points

    Program Summary:

    In 2012, the City of Frostburg completed a project in which an in-line hydroelectric turbine was installed in the 16” raw water main. This project is an innovative project in the State of Maryland, and the City worked with the local delegation in order to change state law in regard to net metering; the law needed to be changed so that the City would be credited for 100% of the electricity generated at the hydroelectric plant. The City of Frostburg maintains two raw water sources, Piney Dam and Savage Springs and Wells, both located in Garrett County on the west side Big Savage Mountain. There are pumps at both water sources that pump the water over the ridge of the mountain, and from there the water gravity flows to the Raw Water Dam, where the water is stored prior to gravity flowing to the Water Treatment Plant. The hydroelectric turbine was installed just upstream of the Raw Water Dam. The turbine was about a $600,000 project and was part of a larger water project which replaced the raw water main between Piney Dam and the Raw Water Dam with a larger and smoother pipe, also increasing efficiency. In 2016, the hydroelectric turbine generated 247,641 kWh, which was 14% of the total electricity consumed by the City government. ___ The City of Frostburg co-sponsored a public info session of the Mountain Maryland Solar Co-op on Wednesday, August 24, 2016 @ 6 PM at City Place. FrostburgFirst [ http://www.downtownfrostburg.com ] was the other co-sponsor. The City provided the venue as well as promoted the event with FrostburgFirst. The session was facilitated by Corey Ramsden, Program Director, MD SUN [ http://www.mdsun.org ]. Laura McBride and Joe Rogers provided information and applications forms for the City’s Historic District Commission approval and general construction permit processes, respectively. MD SUN is the non-profit arm, operating in Maryland, of Community Power Network [ http://communitypowernetwork.com ] which also operates in DC, VA, WV, and OH. MD SUN’s role was to educate homeowners on solar PV issues and pros & cons, including financial incentives and then facilitate the co-op process. MD SUN is not a contractor or installer. Attendees could sign up by the announced deadline enabling MD SUN to pre-assess their site for solar suitability. When all sites had been pre-assessed, MD SUN wrote and publicized the RFP for the entire project which covered about 60 homeowners in both Allegany and Garrett Counties. After RFP bids were received by MD SUN, those who had signed up with the co-op were offered the opportunity to participate as members of the Selection Committee to determine for all co-op members which of the installers would be awarded the co-op’s contract. By purchasing as a co-op the unit price for “bought in bulk” panels would be used for the individual site proposals. When each homeowner had received their proposals from Big D Electric, they could then decide whether or not to accept and make the financial commitment. In the end about 20% [12 out of 63 sign-ups] have had installations performed. ____ The City of Frostburg sponsored ENERGY MATTER$: $avings through Conservation and Efficiency on Saturday, March 28, 2015 from 9 AM - Noon at City Place. The primary goal was to introduce the topic, technology, pros & cons via presentations from local/area residents and professionals focusing on residential as well as commercial and industrial sites. The secondary goal was to provide exposure for professional auditors, installers, and vendors thereby supporting local economic development. The event was offered in two back-to-back segments. The first featured residential applications beginning with a first-person testimony by a Cumberland, MD resident on the advantages he gained by implementing conservation and efficiency options in his home. It was followed by an energy efficiency professional who covered rebate programs, explained more deeply the technical aspects of residential options such as thermal image scanning, and demonstrated the use of a blower door to detect leaks. The second segment focused on commercial and industrial sites. While some local professionals were found in the Frostburg area, most referenced their vendors. Fortunately there was a regional vendors convention taking place at Rocky Gap State Park here in Allegany County which made it possible to have representatives at this event. Several presenters brought displays and interacted with attendees during the break and for a short time after the commercial and industrial segment. Presenters [SEE 2 Program scans] were from Maryland [Hagerstown and Frederick] as well as Ohio and Pennsylvania. ____ The City of Frostburg offered SOLAR Saturday on October 18, 2014 from 9 AM - Noon at City Place, 14 S. Water Street, Frostburg. It was free and open to the public with no registration necessary. The primary goal was to introduce residential solar PV through presentations by local residents with solar PV arrays. The secondary goal was to provide exposure for local installers in the Frostburg and surrounding area with the anticipated outcome of generating contracts for installers, thereby supporting local economic development. The 3-hour session covered three segments of interaction. The first segment was a panel discussion by Frostburg residents; one with a 10-year old PV array and 2 who recently had PV arrays installed. The second segment focused on PV technology and installations of two local installers. It also included presentations by City staff regarding the City’s general construction permitting application process and the relevant issues/permitting process regarding residents of the City’s Historic District. The third segment included presentations by owners of 2 local commercial sites with solar PV arrays [SEE ATTACHED PDFs of the program]. Approximately 30 - 35 people attended and provided positive feedback on the session topic and information provided; especially that it featured local residential arrays and local installers. SOLAR Saturday 2 was offered on July 18, 2015 due to requests from the public who were not aware of the initial SOLAR Saturday event or had a scheduling conflict. SOLAR Saturday 2 was based on the 9 AM - Noon structure of SOLAR Saturday, but with a different panel of residential PV array owners who signed contracts based on their participation at SOLAR Saturday. Another difference was that only the more local installer could participate as the other installer said he was too busy.

    Municipal Energy Audits

    20 Points Priority

    Program Summary:

    In 2014, the City of Frostburg adopted a Resolution for designation as a Maryland Smart Energy Community, and committed to the 2 goals of 1.) lowering the City’s energy consumption by 15% in 5 years and 2.) increasing the City’s consumption of renewable energy to 20% by 2022. The City has received grants through the MSEC program in 2014, 2015, and 2016. Some of the grant funding used in 2014 was used to fund audits of select municipal buildings. The City contracted with RACON Engineering to perform energy audits of the three major City operated buildings: the Community Center, the Public Safety Building, and City Hall. The pumps at the Community Pool were also evaluated. To date, the Community Center has been completely retrofitted with modern LED lighting and electricity consumption has decreased by 20% since their installation. Additionally, approximately 60% of the City’s architectural street lamps on Main Street have been retrofitted from high-pressure sodium to LED and the City’s streetlight energy consumption has been reduced by 14%. As part of the energy audit, the City had to compile historic electricity consumption information for the three buildings audited. As part of the MSEC program, the City maintains a energy consumption profile, in which electricity consumption, by month, is maintained in a spreadsheet for every electric account paid by the City. This allows the City to effectively and efficiently track energy consumption from 2014 to the present. As part of the Energy Audits, only electricity consumption was evaluated, as that is what would qualify under the MSEC program. To date, about 30% of the work has been completed - all of the Community Center has been retrofitted. The Police Station and City Hall has not been retrofitted to date because the City is currently seeking funding for a $2M consolidation and renovation project. Both buildings are 50% vacant because the 2nd stories are not handicap accessible. The renovation project would modernize the current Police Station building, make it fully accessible, and energy efficient and City Hall staff would occupy the 2nd floor. The City Hall building would be sold. This investment is much more sound than trying to improve the efficiency at both buildings. It is anticipated this project will be completed in the next 2-3 years. The audited buildings are highlighted in yellow on the attached spreadsheet.

  • Buy Local Campaign

    Buy Local Campaign

    15 Points

    Program Summary:

    Frostburg initiates a Buy Local Campaign by organizing collective advertising, partnering with businesses to host downtown events, and hosting business development workshops to help businesses get the tools they need to effectively market their business. Each holiday season, in coordination with National Small Business Saturday, Frostburg organizes a collective advertising campaign for small businesses to advertise their holiday specials and to create awareness of the many options for shopping local during the Holidays. Frostburg, a registered Neighborhood Champion for Small Business Saturday, distributes Shop Small totes, stickers, buttons, etc. to local businesses, provided by American Express, and hosts the Handmade Holiday Fair, comprised of 10 - 15 local crafters and artisans. On Saturday, September 10, 2016, Frostburg partnered with the Frostburg State University Student Government Association and Student and Community Involvement office to plan Frostburg 101: A Taste of the City, an event to introduce and familiarize students with local restaurants and shops. A majority of students come here to college from elsewhere, so familiarizing them with the community and their options to shop and eat locally creates the likelihood that students will shop and eat local in the future. A second annual event is scheduled for September 2017. Promotions and events are geared to drive consumers directly to the doors of our local shops and restaurants, thus creating an experience between businesses and consumers to foster local continued local shopping. The FrostburgFirst Main Street Manager manages the Buy Local campaign. The City and FrostburgFirst support cooperative advertising efforts 50/50, making for a total budget of about $2,000. The Main Street Manager also takes full advantage of the Small Business Saturday resources available from American Express - tote bags, window decals, door mats, pins and posters are used all over Frostburg.

    Establish Local Business Directory

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Frostburg established a Frostburg Business Directory in Spring 2015 to serve as a local shopping resource for community members and visitors. The directory includes all businesses, services, and organizations within Frostburg’s boundaries, as well as our Parks and Recreation listings, local history, and a map of downtown Frostburg. When the directory was first printed, it was mailed to all community members in the 21532 zip code, reaching about 8,000 people. The intention of the initial mailing was to create awareness of the publication (receipts attached). Currently, to promote the directory, they are available in local restaurants, shops, hotels, and real estate offices. The directory is also distributed at the Frostburg State University student preview, the Frostburg State University and Community Block Party, and other community events, where Frostburg First has a staffed table to distribute materials. Frostburg First will mail directories to houses when requested. There is also an online version of the directory available for download on the Frostburg First www.downtownfrostburg.com website. View the directory here: https://indd.adobe.com/view/c57c5b21-5ba3-448a-9f0a-fbcfa2aa4a54

  • Natural Resources

    Innovative Demonstration Projects - Natural Resources

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    For many years the City of Frostburg offered all residents City-wide, curbside collection of Yard Waste; generally once/month from April through September and potentially twice in the months of October and November based on the leaf-fall. Most recently the collected material is delivered to Frostburg Grows, a local non-profit, for their use in creating compost/mulch for their on-site application. Frostburg Grows website: http://www.frostburggrows.com Frostburg Grows Facebook site: https://www.facebook.com/FrostburgGrows Originally, residents were permitted to put their yard waste at curbside in plastic bags, cans/tubs, or cardboard boxes. In July 2014 the newly-elected Commissioner of Public Works began riding these collections and noticed that the delivered material was made work intensive and less valuable by the use of plastic bags. It meant that Frostburg Grows staff and volunteers were needed to pull the plastic bags from the pile and fully empty their contents. [SEE Photo - Opening bags at FG]. Additionally the Commissioner and crew on the collection/delivery truck assisted. Soon after the Commissioner made the decision to have the plastic bags opened at curbside and yard material emptied into the hopper; causing the collection process to take longer while saving time at the delivery site and improving the composting process. Eventually the Commissioner proposed that the City regulations be revised to prohibit the use of plastic bags for these curbside collections of yard material in order to improve the efficiency of both the collection and composting. In 2015, the Mayor & Council approved Ordinance 2015-01 [SEE Attached] which permitted yard waste to be placed in only paper biodegradable yard/garden bags, cans/tubs, or cardboard boxes; thus prohibiting plastic bags for these collections. Biodegradable paper lawn/leaf bags cost about the same as plastic bags, could be bought in the City, and have the advantage of standing upright while being filled. It was agreed that calendar year 2015 would be used for public education and promotion of the change. [SEE Photo - NO Plastic Bags in 2016]. Implementation of the ordinance began with the April 2016 collection with much success and little, if any complaint. [SEE Photo - FG windrow without plastic bags].

    Tree City USA

    15 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Frostburg received designation as a Tree City USA for the third year in 2016. The City of Frostburg has a Shade Tree Commission, and has adopted a resolution appointing persons to the Commission, adopting a street tree maintenance policy, and a recommended trees leist. The City works closely with 2 DNR foresters to manage the City’s tree inventory as well as develop new planting projects. The City, between volunteer hours spent on planting trees, staff time maintaining or removing trees, and cost of planting and maintaining trees has met the $2 per capita requirement in 2013, 2015, and 2016. In the 2017-18 budget, for the first time, $8,200 has been dedicated specifically for tree planting and tree care. Additionally, during the City’s volunteer day, “Beautify the Burg”, on May 6, 93 native trees were planted, 73 of which were street trees and the remaining 20 within a City park. Public notice was provided about the planting and care of the street trees. The City annually proclaims the first Saturday of May and Frostburg’s Arbor Day, to coincide with tree planting during Beautify the Burg. Many of the street trees in the City are showing signs of disease or structural failure and are slated for replacement. Acknowledging the need to maintain and improve the street tree canopy, the Mayor and City council are dedicating resources to the effort. Students of Allegany College of Maryland will be performing a detailed street tree inventory for the City in June 2017 so that the City can best manage the street trees for care and replacement. Moving forward, a diverse stock of native street trees will be planted (so not all trees become diseased, or structurally fail at the same time, and therefore need to be removed at the same time).

  • Pet Waste

    Adopt a Pet Waste Ordinance

    5 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Frostburg adopted a Dangerous Dog Ordinance in 2007, which includes language making it unlawful for an owner not to pick up dog waste deposited on public or private property. This Ordinance is enforced by the Frostburg Police Department. In addition, there are several signs throughout the community notifying residents about the Ordinance and that violations are subject to a minimum of a $100 fine. There are also numerous stations with pet waste bags in City parks and parking lots.

  • Water Conservation

    Develop a Water Conservation Plan

    15 Points

    Program Summary:

    In 2011, the City of Frostburg adopted its Comprehensive Plan, which included a Water Resources Element as required by state law. The City of Frostburg also has a Water Conservation Plan that is updated annually (attached) as well as a Water Supply Study. The City also performs a water audit annually. The City of Frostburg is very conscientious of the need to manage its water sources, conveyance systems, and treatment capabilities to ensure that there is adequate supply to address current demand and projected growth. The City currently has additional capacity available for production, but has recently completed projects that reduce raw water loss and promote energy conservation. The two raw water reservoirs at the Savage Pumping Station, and the raw water dam, just upstream of the Frostburg Water Treatment Plant, have all been relined in the last few years to reduce water loss. The City’s pricing structure for treated water also encourages water conservation, as the price per gallon more than doubles above 50,000 gallons per quarter. Additionally, the City sells treated water to Allegany County to supply 17 small communities with drinking water. Because of this, the City’s rate structure has been reviewed and approved by the USDA-Rural Development and the Public Service Commission. Recently Mount Savage and Barrelville have been added to the system, again, reinforcing the City’s need to responsibly manage the water consumption. The 2016 Water Audit tabulation is attached. A new water conservation plan has not yet been completed.

  • Planning & Land Use

    Innovative Demonstration Projects - Planning & Land Use

    10 Points

    Program Summary:

    Infill Development Overlay Zone In 2014, the City of Frostburg adopted a new Zoning Ordinance. The Zoning Ordinance was rewritten over a period of 2 years and was updated to provide for contemporary development styles and increased density in certain neighborhoods. In the neighborhoods surrounding Frostburg State’s Campus, a new zoning district was added, “University Commercial” which allows for mixed use development in the denser residential areas of the City that are primarily comprised of student rentals. In addition, as part of the Zoning Ordinance, a new overlay zone was included, the “Infill Development Zone”. This overlay includes areas on Main Street and in the neighborhoods surrounding Frostburg where there is antiquated housing stock that is primarily rentals. The Infill Development zone allows a developer to acquire one or more lots, a construct housing units that would be permitted by right. But, the Infill Development zone also allows the developer to increase density, reduce lot size and parking requirements, etc., if a plan, including architectural renderings, is submitted to and approved by the Frostburg Planning Commission. Pedestrian connectivity, design compatibility, and other aspects are considered by the Planning Commission as part of their approval process. This zone has been very successful since its implementation. The City has permitted 3 redevelopment projects under the Infill Development zone regulations, one of which is a 28 unit apartment building on 4 lots, directly across from the Frostburg State campus. This project also included the removal of three blighted single family homes. The overlay zone has provided flexibility to developers in Frostburg, but with additional oversight. The outcomes intended by the zone also align with Maryland’s Smart Growth principles by encouraging redevelopment where ample infrastructure is already in place. The re-write was largely done by the Community Development staff and the Frostburg Planning Commission. The recommendation for the infill development zone came from a consultant that was hired to do high-level review of the Zoning Ordinance (Peter Johnston). The Ordinance was also reviewed in depth by the City Attorney. From the initial meeting with the Planning Commission to discuss the zoning ordinance re-write, to the adoption, the process took about 2 years.

    Participation in DHCD Sustainable Communities

    20 Points

    Program Summary:

    The City of Frostburg, in 2011, applied to be designated a Sustainable Community under a program established by the Sustainable Communities Act of 2010 and operated by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. This certification allowed the City of Frostburg to continue to access economic development and revitalization funds through programs such as Community Legacy and Neighborhood BusinessWorks. The application required that communities first define a pre-existing built-up geographic area that could benefit from state investment. The process also included a description of baseline indicators, as well as an explanation of the local capacity to implement the proposed action plan. The City of Frostburg then drafted a Sustainable Community Action Plan which detailed 5 action areas. · Supporting existing communities & reducing environmental impacts · Valuing communities and neighborhoods -- building upon assets and building in amenities · Enhancing economic competitiveness · Promoting access to quality affordable housing · Support transportation efficiency and access For each action area, the plan proposed a set of policies and/or initiatives designed to achieve these goals. The action plan was developed by the City Community Development Staff, a committee of 10 community members, and was reviewed and approved by the Mayor and City Council. A group of individuals and organizations in the community were identified as implementers for each action area. The City established benchmarks against which to measure progress. In Allegany County, both the City of Frostburg and the City of Cumberland became approved sustainable communities under this program for an initial period of five years. Numerous projects arose out of this designation, notably, replacement of all of the sidewalks and ramps along Main Street (US 40) within the City through the SHA sidewalk retrofit program, record high funding for CSO separation projects from MDE, a strategic demolition project that involved razing a condemned structure and the development of a public parking lot with a parklet where the building once stood, and various other Community Legacy projects to improve the buildings within the central business district.